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GNU/Linux  "Help a newbie"

User is offline   Kathy 

  • 1,223

#1

Long story short, how the hell can I open bash/command line/tty shell in KDE? I'm getting annoyed switching between KDE and terminal with ctrl-alt-f1tof7. "Run command" doesn't seem to be working. Tweaking freshly installed unfamiliar OS isn't very comfortable when I can't see web browser.

And I can't find proper answer through google.

Shit, I found it in the "start" menu. Sorry....

Windows incompatibility is a feature, not a bug.

This post has been edited by Burnett: 25 December 2012 - 02:31 PM

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User is offline   Plagman 

  • Former VP of Media Operations
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#2

The default KDE terminal emulator is called "Konsole", so I suspect that if you bring up the quick command thing with Alt-F2 and just start typing "konsole" it'll show up.

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User is offline   Kathy 

  • 1,223

#3

Yep, it is. I was actually expecting quick command to work like Windows' "run" so I was trying typing 'bash' in there to no avail.

I don't know what to do next. Either use it as my primal OS through VirtualBox for internet browsing and stuff, or try to do dual boot for be able to play some native videogames on it.

Or just stay on Win7 since I've got it pretty tightly configured with EFS, backups, user management and stuff.

One thing annoyed me somehow. In Linux manuals it is said that you shouldn't work with root privileges and stuff cause it's insecure and stupid. Yet it is pretty normal practice for advanced users to work under "root" in Windows. Once I tell those people to work under "user" they start saying crap like "it's my system and I'm not gonna limit myself". How Linux/*nix mamaged to teach the same advanced users not to work under root yet Windows mostly failed?

Windows incompatibility is a feature, not a bug.
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User is offline   Kathy 

  • 1,223

#4

I think I'm ready to built PC for GNU/Linux-based OS.

So I need some general recommendation regarding brands and theirs work in Linux environment. Not strictly a "help me build PC" question.

CPU: I guess it doesn't matter, but probably go with Intel.
MB: I have no idea which brand to use concerning driver support etc.
Video: AMD or Nvidia?
HDD: Does SSD or HDD matter?

How is gaming on Linux generally? :(

Windows incompatibility is a feature, not a bug.
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User is offline   Kathy 

  • 1,223

#5

Bumping my own "corner". Since 2013 I'm using Arch for desktop PC. Win7 license is still installed on another computer, but I used it mostly for work. Also, Rocket League is out now.

Windows incompatibility is a feature, not a bug.
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User is offline   Mblackwell 

  • Evil Overlord
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#6

What apps are you using that wouldn't work well in a VM or with Wine?

On games only about 90 titles in my library DON'T run have a Linux port but it's mostly all things that run under Wine (or in some cases have a Linux port just not on Steam). Except like... The Witcher 3 which I bought during the SteamOS sale but the port still hasn't materialized.

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User is offline   Kathy 

  • 1,223

#7

I don't use any non-native apps. Software wasn't really a problem for my switch. As for games... In Wine I played some old ones like Thief. Also, all of a sudden I decided to continue playing SWToR after several years of not doing so. But generally I don't really use Wine. And certainly I'm not buying games that don't have gnu/linux support. Many AAA games aren't available, but I'm not really interested in most of them anyway.

Windows incompatibility is a feature, not a bug.
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User is offline   Person of Color 

  • Senior Unpaid Intern at Viceland
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#8

View PostKathy, on 10 September 2016 - 01:15 PM, said:

Bumping my own "corner". Since 2013 I'm using Arch for desktop PC. Win7 license is still installed on another computer, but I used it mostly for work. Also, Rocket League is out now.


>Using Arch

Why not use a distro that works, like OpenSUSE?

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User is offline   Micky C 

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#9

So, having gotten comfortable with using the terminal on macOS, I've decided to give Linux another shot (primarily to indulge my curiosity, not to replace macOS since I've just got the latest of everything). I've installed Ubuntu, and set up all the software I could possibly need to run my phd, everything from finite element analysis to interpretation and visualization of results, and even writing the journal papers with a bibliography package that integrates into the word processor. I had no idea that everything could run on linux, let alone run smoothly and in a polished interface. If I had to buy the software myself without the backing of the university, then I'm looking at easily over $1000, but here it all is completely free...

Now I'm wondering if I have the best linux installed. I'm comfortable with using Ubuntu, but everyone on the internet seems so split towards their own preferred versions. My question is; is there really a wrong linux to work with, or does it mostly come down to preference for the interface itself?

Also, would anyone recommend installing linux on a live USB so that the OS and all the software and data are booted directly from the USB itself? The main downside to this I've read on the internet is that the USB tends to wear out quite quickly due to the frequent reading and writing.

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User is offline   TerminX 

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  #10

Ubuntu, Debian, and Arch are all pretty good imo. The Debian based stuff (Ubuntu is based on Debian) tends to be the best as far as a wide range of software availability goes. It's the most popular so it has the most people packaging the most software.

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User is online   Hendricks266 

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  #11

If you're going to install Linux, make it a separate partition on your main disk. A USB device will be slow and cumbersome. You may need to shrink your macOS partition in Disk Manager. Once both are installed, add rEFInd to complete the dual-boot.
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User is offline   Micky C 

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#12

Thanks for the tips. I'm currently running it in the Parallels VM. Currently there's no need to do anything dedicated with it since the University does provide all the software. I'm just thinking ahead to a few years' time after the backing stops, as my work has potential commercial applications that I may or may not exploit. Pretty much all the software I've installed on Ubuntu is also available on macOS, stuff like the GCC for example.

My macbook pro is also university-owned and will likely have to return it at the end. I'm looking into linux because I really, really don't want to go back to windows for research. For a variety of reasons the terminal makes research a lot smoother, and having to install clunky windows addons like Putty doesn't appeal to me.

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User is offline   TerminX 

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  #13

View PostHendricks266, on 13 February 2017 - 04:07 PM, said:

If you're going to install Linux, make it a separate partition on your main disk. A USB device will be slow and cumbersome. You may need to shrink your macOS partition in Disk Manager. Once both are installed, add rEFInd to complete the dual-boot.

Yeah, the only way a USB device would work acceptably would be if you had a SSD in an enclosure rather than a run-of-the-mill flash drive. The main thing that sucks about that is that they usually don't support passing a TRIM command along to the device.

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User is offline   Mblackwell 

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#14

I have an HDD in an enclosure that I run the OS from. Not exactly fast boot and update times, but overall system performance is good. Not necessarily recommended, however it was more useful back when I was still using Windows since I could just swap what was plugged in.

I tend to recommend Ubuntu GNOME, but regular Ubuntu is fine. There is no "best", only what suits you. Ubuntu and derivatives tend to have most of what you need ready to go and easy ways to get the rest (and very active communities for anything else). But Arch for example also has an active community and even though using it might not be recommended for the average joe the information you find in that community mostly applies everything since in general Linux is Linux minus certain distro specific file tree structures and package managers and such.

/home and the OS should be separate btw (in my opinion at least). in case of catastrophe it's easy to just blow up the OS partition. /home has all of your stuff anyway including settings.

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User is offline   Forge 

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#15

View PostTerminX, on 13 February 2017 - 04:01 PM, said:

Ubuntu, Debian, and Arch are all pretty good imo. The Debian based stuff (Ubuntu is based on Debian) tends to be the best as far as a wide range of software availability goes. It's the most popular so it has the most people packaging the most software.

I have Debian on a separate hard drive as part of my dual boot system.
Solid. Reliable. A lot of packages. Good support, because a lot of people use it.
I'd recommend the .deb distros over the .rpm flavors. - Just for reliability & stability alone.
Whichever distro you go with is more or less personal preference.

https://distrowatch.com/

This community is always helpful, no matter what distribution you operate.
https://www.linuxquestions.org/

This post has been edited by Forge: 13 February 2017 - 09:51 PM

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User is offline   Micky C 

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#16

I might as well stick with default Ubuntu then since I've already got a few things set up on it. I'll invest in a small solid state drive down the track to install the OS on.

Edit: Mblackwell I assume you were running that HDD on USB 3?

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This post has been edited by Micky C: 14 February 2017 - 03:04 AM

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User is online   MusicallyInspired 

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#17

I miss Linux and I've love to use it but I simply need Windows for my main programs. My hard drives are almost maxed out so dual boot isn't an option.

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User is offline   Mblackwell 

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#18

View PostMicky C, on 14 February 2017 - 12:41 AM, said:

I might as well stick with default Ubuntu then since I've already got a few things set up on it. I'll invest in a small solid state drive down the track to install the OS on.

Edit: Mblackwell I assume you were running that HDD on USB 3?


Currently yes, however my old boards only supported 2.0 and the experience was much the same.

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User is offline   Forge 

  • 6,683

#19

GUI is also preference.
KDE is more like a windows environment.
Gnome is more like an OSX environment.

There are others as well, but these have been the two primary ones for several years now.

This post has been edited by Forge: 14 February 2017 - 12:28 PM

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User is online   MusicallyInspired 

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#20

You can also have both.

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User is offline   Forge 

  • 6,683

#21

You could if you wanted, but I don't see why you'd want to waste the storage space. Just use the one you're comfortable with.

What I like is that the O/S isn't the GUI. the GUI is just a component of the O/S. (an optional component at that)
If you don't like the version of the GUI you have, you can "downgrade" or go "backwards" in packages without the entire system throwing a fit and going into meltdown.

This post has been edited by Forge: 14 February 2017 - 01:47 PM

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User is online   MusicallyInspired 

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#22

The modularity of Linux is indeed quite nice.

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User is offline   Sledgehammer 

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#23

Fedora is pretty good distro as well which has very good software support and documentation since it's widely used just like Ubuntu. Don't recall if I had any issues with it.
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Also, KDE has very adorable mascot.
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User is offline   Micky C 

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#24

I'm under the impression that Fedora is more of a bleeding edge distro for those who like to use the latest new features in linux (and can sometimes be buggy as a result). I'm just after something relatively static that has the software I need and does the job.

I've had a quick look at SteamOS. Apparent game performance is a lot worse than on windows. I wouldn't have thought there'd be much of a difference since SteamOS is designed explicitly for gaming while Windows has to be a more general purpose OS. But I guess Windows has had a lot longer to improve these things.

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User is online   Hendricks266 

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  #25

It's probably more that most effort on game rendering code is going to DirectX layers, and not OpenGL or Vulkan.
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User is offline   Sledgehammer 

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#26

Yeah, it kinda is, although you don't have to use every update and it rarely has issues now (that was different long time ago, I don't remember last time I experienced some nasty bugs). I mean this is not Windows 10, you can control everything. Another good thing about Fedora is security.

Did they even finished SteamOS? I believe they wanted to make it because they were afraid that MS would block Steam on Windows 10.
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User is online   MusicallyInspired 

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#27

They weren't "afraid" of anything. Gabe Newell got fed up with Microsoft's attempts to put up a walled garden environment with the Windows Store. SteamOS was also a part of bringing Steam gameplay to the couch, along with Steam Machines, the Steam Streamer box and Steam Controller.

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This post has been edited by MusicallyInspired: 17 February 2017 - 06:18 PM

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User is offline   Micky C 

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#28

IMO anything to chip away at Microsoft's apparent computer gaming monopoly is a good thing.

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User is offline   Forge 

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#29

I don't know about "modern" Fedora, but I used Redhat when I first started using Linux. Redhat decided they wanted to "split" their distros. Redhat went "Enterprise/commercial" and Fedora was the public open distro offshoot. It was buggy as hell. Couldn't do shit with it and there was no reliability or stability.
I then switched to Mandrake Linux, but shortly afterwards it went through changes, re-branded as Mandriva, and turned to shit as well.
Been on Debian since.

It's been quite awhile, so Fedora might be alright. I can't say for sure; all I know is that some of my last experiences with rpm based distros weren't that great.

If I were to try an rpm distro, I'd probably give openSuse a go.
I tried it before I went to debian. It seemed okay and at least stable, but at the time I was having problems getting it to play nice with my hardware, so i moved on.

This post has been edited by Forge: 17 February 2017 - 10:26 PM

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User is offline   Forge 

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#30

------or you could install VMware and kali linux.------
if anybody asks, it was Viper's idea.
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